Ethiopia Chelelektu (250g)

Ethiopia Chelelektu (250g)

€9,90
QTY.

High-toned, crisply sweet-tart. Bakers chocolate, raspberry, blueberry, guava, freesia in aroma and cup. Sweetly tart structure with juicy, citrus-like acidity and viscous, buoyant mouthfeel. The finish centers around notes of jasmine and cocoa nib with undertones of milk chocolate..

1800 m

Kurume, Dega, Wolisho

Smallholder farms

Ethiopia

Farm: Smallholder farms

BEHIND PRODUCTION

The Chelelektu washing station was built in 2010 and processes up to 950,000kg of ripe coffee cherries each year from its 363 contributing smallholders who bring their ripe cherries for processing. Farmers around Chelelektu have trees at elevations ranging from 1300-2200 meters above sea level, making it one of the washing stations with coffees from the widest range of elevations in Yirgacheffe.

Since 2014, the washing station has improved its infrastructure. Natural coffees are dried for 21 days on 134 raised beds in the sun across the washing station’s almost 3 hectares of land at 1700 masl. The Chelelektu washing station is named for the Chelelektu kebele, or town, where it is located in the Kochere district of the Yirgacheffe coffee area of the Gedeo Zone.

LOCATION

Yirgacheffe is one of the coffee areas defined by the Ethiopia Commodity Exchange in recognition of the common quality and flavor attributes of coffee grown in the area around Yirgacheffe. This broad coffee area includes part of the Bornea Zone of the Oromia Region and the Gedeo Zone of the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People’s Region (SNNPR). The Gedeo Zone of SNNPR has five woredas, or districts: Wonago, Bule, Kochere, Gedeb, and Yirgacheffe, the last giving this coffee region its name.

The Kochere woreda is located to the south of Yirgacheffe woreda, to the north of Gedeb woreda, to the east of Oromia Zone and has a total population of more than 130,000 people. The people of Kochere observe many religions, speak many languages, and belong to many ethnic groups, including the Gedo, the Oromo, and the Amhara. The climate in Kochere sees 1592ml annual rainfall with temperatures between 16.5 and 18.3° C.

We got to know Chelelektu via Ally Coffee. Ally’s Company backgrounds and expertise in coffee empower so as to build an open community around inspiration, knowledge and guidance. They believe this is the only way to improve both the product and the experience at every step.Their ambition is to continue to build Ally on foundations of shared value and mutual reward and make coffee a global model for business.

About Chelelektu

REGION:Yirgachefe

ALTITUDE:1800 m

PROCESS:Natural

ARRIVED IN:60kg Grain Pro

VARIETIES:Dega, Wolisho

AROMA:Blueberry, freesia

FLAVOR:Dark chocolate, Raspberry, Citrus

BODY:Creamy

FINISH:Guava, Jasmine

Dry Milling

Coffee is prepared for export at Tracon Trading’s coffee cleaning and storage plant on 30,000 sq meters of land in Addis Ababa. The plant is equipped with modern Pinhalense coffee processing machines and a Buhler Z+ color sorter. The machine has the capacity of processing six tons per hour. Beans pass through a final hand sort on conveyor belts. The plant’s six storage silos have a capacity of roughly 15,000 metric tons. The warehouses are clean, with ample lighting and ventilation, which are ideal for maintaining the quality of the coffee.

Coffee Production in Yirgacheffe

Coffee grown in the many districts and kebeles of the Gedeo Zone is often referred to as Heirloom varieties, many of which were propagated and distributed to farmers in the last 40 years. Trees grow in red brown fertile soil under the shade of many tree species including Bibira, Cordia Africana, and the subsistence crop Ensete ventricosum.

In the southern region of Ethiopia, farmers pick coffee selectively, harvesting only ripe cherries individually by hand. Pickers rotate among the trees every eight to ten days, choosing only the cherries which are at peak ripeness.

Many pickers average approximately 100 to 200 pounds of coffee cherries a day, which will produce 20 to 40 pounds of coffee beans. Each worker’s daily haul is carefully weighed, and each picker is paid on the merit of his or her work. The day’s harvest is then transported to the processing plant.